Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is often heard in discussions of vehicle accident injuries, nursing home accident injuries, and other types of injuries, including those in sports.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a page for traumatic brain injury which has a variety of statistics and discussion of this injury topic.

As seen on this page:

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious public health problem in the United States. Each year, traumatic brain injuries contribute to a substantial number of deaths and cases of permanent disability. In 2010 2.5 million TBIs occured either as an isolated injury or along with other injuries.

As to how TBI occurs, the page provides the following explanation:

A TBI is caused by a bump, blow or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the normal function of the brain. Not all blows or jolts to the head result in a TBI. The severity of a TBI may range from “mild,” i.e., a brief change in mental status or consciousness to “severe,” i.e., an extended period of unconsciousness or amnesia after the injury.

Mayo Clinic also has a page for Traumatic brain injury in which it provides a similar explanation, as well as a number of other resources regarding TBI.

Of course, any time a head injury occurs, one should have it immediately assessed by a qualified medical professional, as such head injuries can often be serious, and in many cases fatal.  As seen in the “Severe Traumatic Brain Injury” page:

Each year, TBIs contribute to a substantial number of deaths and cases of permanent disability. In fact, TBI is a contributing factor to a third (30%) of all injury-related deaths in the United States.1 In 2010, approximately 2.5 million people sustained a traumatic brain injury.

As also seen on this Severe Traumatic Brain Injury page:

Among all age groups, motor vehicle crashes and traffic-related incidents result in the largest percentage of TBI-related deaths (31.8%).

Given the serious consequences of head trauma – as seen in many Chicago vehicle accidents, as well as accidents elsewhere in Illinois and nationally –  perhaps a primary question is what steps can be taken when one is traveling to reduce the chance of having such a head injury?  There are many preventative measures that can be taken, and these include:

  • wearing seat belts
  • avoiding drunk driving
  • avoiding distracted driving
  • avoiding driving while impaired

Of course, bicyclists and motorcyclists are especially at risk for head trauma injuries.  Discussions of the benefits of bicycle helmets in avoiding potential head injuries is mentioned in a variety of posts, including the July 12, 2014 post titled “Bicycling Helmets And Their Importance Regarding Head Injuries.”

The importance of helmet use to motorcyclist rider safety is discussed on the “Illinois Motorcyclist Safety And Helmet Use” page.

Should you be injured in an Illinois accident, there are a variety of steps you should take to both protect your health and your legal rights, including your rights to monetary recovery.  From a legal perspective, it is highly beneficial to talk with an Illinois personal injury lawyer soon after an accident, as there are various steps you should take to protect your rights and help maximize your potential to attain compensation for your injuries and other harm.

Should you be injured in an accident, call Tony Elman at (773) 392-8182 to discuss the accident and see what legal actions may be taken.  This legal consultation is provided free and is confidential in nature.

Elman Law Group, LLC handles cases on a contingency basis…you will not be charged legal fees unless and until there is a monetary recovery.

Elman Law Group has been handling Illinois personal injury cases for over 20 years.  During this time, we have handled over 10,000 Illinois personal injury lawsuits, and we have established a reputation for our court trial capabilities.  In addition to handling our own personal injury court trials, we also handle those from other firms.